Thursday, March 11, 2010

CrossFit ATL 4598 Brandon & Leah P. go for an 11 ft wall ball target

Workout of the Day

Front Squat

12 sets of 2

Use 60% of 1 RM.  Rest 60 sec between sets.  Be explosive out of the bottom.

Video of the Run Up The Rock at the Georgia Sectionals, starring several recognizable figures

"Erin Cafaro Learns to Run" Part 1 with Dr. Romanov, a CrossFit Journal preview video [wmv] [mov]

"Erin Cafaro Learns to Run" Part 2 with Dr. Romanov, a CrossFit Journal preview video [wmv] [mov]

8 signs you are overtraining.


Notice

We will be closed this weekend while hosting the CrossFit Gymnastics Seminar. 

Recent Posts
Showing 17 comments
  • Steve
    Reply

    Since we’ve got lots of posts on running lately, both here and on the paleo challenge forum, I wanted to plug two races coming up:
    1. Granite Grinder half marathon
    Saturday, April 17, 2010 @ 8:00 AM
    Out in Conyers at the International Horse Park
    This is a very fun trail run — the first two thirds or so are single track and double track winding in and out of flat pine forest, then it starts to get hilly with some rock slab type stuff at the end. At least that is how I remember it! Registration is $50 up until the end of March, then it goes up to $60.
    http://www.goodrunproductions.com/graniteGrinder/
    2. Peachtree road race
    July 4, 2010
    While the race is a ways off, registration is just around the corner. From the Atlanta Track Club website:
    “Online registration for the AJC Peachtree Road Race 2010 will open at 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, March 21, 2010 at http://www.ajc.com/peachtree. The first 45,000 out 55,000 total entries will be accepted through online registration.”
    Last year was the first year they used on-line registration, offering 40,000 spots, and it filled up in about four hours. If you miss the on-line registration, they will fill the last 10,000 spots through a mail-in registration (race application will appear in the March 28th Atlanta Journal & Constitution).

  • MikeG_CFATL
    Reply

    I know we have a lot of people doing the Paleo Challenge, so I have a question for you all…
    Do you weigh and measure your food? If not, do you plan on weighing and measuring in the future?
    In my opinion, I think it is important. It is good to use Zone blocks and find a baseline. This gives you a reference point. If things are going wrong, maybe you’re not recovering or you’re low on energy, you can tweak your diet much easier. Now don’t get me wrong…I’m not saying to go buy the Zone book and follow it blindly. I’m just saying to use to block chart to find your optimal balance of macronutrients.
    Thoughts??

  • Dave Hodges
    Reply

    I don’t know if my thoughts on portioning have any value, but Mark Sisson and Sean Croxton (Underground Wellness) both reject the idea of portioning. From a Paleolithic standpoint, our ancestors most certainly did not portion their foods. That said, they also ate a lot more slowly, spent more time preparing food, and probably had problems with food scarcity. That said, they probably ate a lot less than we do.
    Michael Pollan recommends eating more slowly, and at the same time, eating till you’re full. I have found that when I do this, I am content with 1,600 to 1,800 kcal per day, and I don’t feel like I’m making weight for a wrestling team.
    Now, if you’re a bodybuilder and every single calorie counts, then I can see where portioning might come in. And if you have a tendency to inhale your food and overeat, then I also can see where portioning would be necessary. But for most people, the best advise I have seen on the matter is to eat “primally” and let your body tell you when is enough.

  • MikeG_CFATL
    Reply

    I understand that thought process. I know that cavemen did not weigh and measure, but lets face it…we are not cavemen. I’m not asking people to weigh and measure for portion control or weight loss. I’m asking them to weigh and measure for performance.

  • Dave Hodges
    Reply

    “[B]ut lets face it…we are not cavemen.”
    Well, that’s a great point. Moderation is something that we have to enforce rather than a natural consequence of our living conditions.
    Since I am not, nor will ever be, an elite athlete, I tend to view diet as a means to a good life, not as a method to hone my athletic performance. I don’t have any retarded dreams of one day competing on any level beyond the local gym wherever I happen to be. So naturally, my perspective is biased.
    But even in terms of athletic performance, I know my strength does way better if I eat a lot. Rippetoe continues to stand by a 3,000 to 4,000 kcal daily diet. And when I was eating like that, I had some good strength. Unfortunately, I was also a fatass, so my calisthenics suffered considerably. So we’re back to balance to determine which diet is best for fitness.
    But this much needs to be said about caloric intake: the workouts we do do change drastically day to day. Our caloric needs are not static in any sense. Portioning would seem to turn your body’s senses away from their natural ability to tell you when you need to eat more. I mean, if we all walked the same distance every day, and did the same 30-minute cardio workout followed by the same strength routine, then yeah, a portioned diet might make sense.
    But really, one day we do Murph, another day we do Fran, and another day we rest, and the next day we run a 5K. Does portioning even make sense in that regard. I don’t think so. I think our bodies can tell us a lot about how much we need to eat and drink.
    And along those lines, do we portion our water as well or do we just drink when we are thirsty? Why would it be any different with food?

  • MikeG_CFATL
    Reply

    Excatly…that is why we would find a baseline. If we see that today we will be doing Murph, maybe we would need to take in a little more carbs. We would then block out some extra carbs to our diet. If we did not have that baseline, how would we know if we ate extra carbs or not. Without knowing how much we are taking in, it is possible that we would eat way too many carbs. What I’m saying about weighing and measuring is that we have that baseline and we can adjust our diet easily and as needed.

  • Dave Hodges
    Reply

    Ah OK, I definitely can see what you’re saying now.

  • mike k
    Reply

    to chime into y’alls discussion, Dave, Mike. Dave it sounds like you understand where mike is coming from. I want to add that 3-4 thousand calories could possibly be a healthier diet than the 16-1800 cals you are taking in now (although not necessarily). at that low an intake with lots of activity, it will be tough not to be deficient in lean muscle and strength. being a fatass at 3-4 thousand calories means you’re probably eating too much carbs and storing the excess. so rather than paying such close attention to calories in calories out, pay closer attention to macronutrient proportioning, eat till your full in well balanced portions, and then see where your total calories or blocks or both comes out to. (if you really want to get precise, figure out what your optimal glycemic load on a given day should be). if you weigh and measure food, you can compare intake with variations in mood, energy, mental clarity, etc, not just physical performance. I myself take in anywhere between 3-5 thousand calories depending on that day and or weeks activity. the carbs always remain with in a relatively small window, without a lot of variance. what varies is fat and protein blocks. if i my body is craving more food, i usually just add more protein and fat (when i am being good)

  • Bethanie
    Reply

    Hey everyone!!! CF ATL hoodies for sale: $35 each. ONly about 15 left in sizes M & L. If you want one I suggest you buy it by friday as I have a feeling guests at the gymnastics cert this weekend will buy whatever is left.

  • mike k
    Reply

    some quotes i wanted to share:
    “an investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”
    -ben franklin
    “success is not final, failure is not fatal: its the courage to continue that counts.”
    -winston churchill
    “love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy into a friend.”
    -MLK Jr.
    “the quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor.”
    -Vince Lombardi
    “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
    -Eleanor Roosevelt
    “weakness of attitude becomes weakness of character.”
    -Albert Einstein
    “we must become the change we want to see in the world.”
    -Mahatma Ghandi
    “failure is simply the opportunity to start again more intelligently.”
    -henry ford

  • Dave Hodges
    Reply

    “I want to add that 3-4 thousand calories could possibly be a healthier diet than the 16-1800 cals you are taking in now (although not necessarily).”
    I think that that kind of caloric intake would be excessive for me. I know it’s been a while since we met, but if you recall I’m pretty small-framed dude (170 cm, 65 kilos). And I’m not doing Tour de France kind of activity. I generally workout only four to five days a week as opposed to the 3-1 schedule promulgated by Glassman. I think studies are generally in favour of calorie reduction if possible. Note that I am not talking about calorie reduction for weight loss, but rather calorie reduction for better health in general. One of the benefits of eating a primal diet is that you don’t need as many calories to function. A junk food diet keeps you at the vending machine three times a day betwixt meals to maintain itself.
    “at that low an intake with lots of activity, it will be tough not to be deficient in lean muscle and strength.”
    Well, it’s a balance like I said. Since those days, I am actually stronger, but I do have to work harder at it. I’m a lot leaner though, so a lot of WODs are much easier for me.
    “being a fatass at 3-4 thousand calories means you’re probably eating too much carbs and storing the excess.”
    That’s entirely possible. I wasn’t really aware of the dangers of refined carbs back in those days. But I was also intentionally eating excessive calories. I ate fix to six meals a day, each one with between 500 and 1000 kcal. It was ridiculous. Nobody should eat like that. Not to mention the exhorbitant food bills I was footing every month.
    “so rather than paying such close attention to calories in calories out”
    Ah, but I’m not paying any attention to calories in calories out – at least not from a weight loss standpoint. I think we’re all generally in agreement here that weight loss is not a mere function of calories consumed versus calories expended. But it is a fact that if you’re going to be expending lots of energy your body will need fuel in the form of calories. The laws of thermodynamics still apply; they just don’t apply in the ridiculous Weight Watchers™ way that most people think. If you’re going to do a workout, you will expend a certain amount of energy that must be compensated for by fuel.
    So when I speak of caloric intake, I am speaking of it with respect to needed fuel and not from weight loss.
    “pay closer attention to macronutrient proportioning, eat till your full in well balanced portions, and then see where your total calories or blocks or both comes out to.”
    That’s actually where I get the 1,600 to 1,800 kcal figure. I arrived at it by observation, not by prescription.
    “(if you really want to get precise, figure out what your optimal glycemic load on a given day should be). if you weigh and measure food, you can compare intake with variations in mood, energy, mental clarity, etc, not just physical performance.”
    And that is what Mike was talking about. And for all you people that actually have the time and energy to calculate all that stuff and track your Fran times down to the last second, by all means, go for it. For me, my Fran time is a function of so many things, many of which I have no control over, that it would be silly for me to go to such lengths. But like I said before, I am no elite athlete. I’m just a guy who benefits from CrossFit generally.

  • Jonathan H CFATL
    Reply

    Speaking from the viewpoint of someone who works long, relatively inflexible hours, and is on a pretty intense training program as well, my reason for not paying attention to weights/measures is that I just don’t have the time to add in another thing to be neurotic about.
    I’d certainly say that the quality of the food is the most important thing, having noticed a drastic positive shift in my performance, sleep, and energy levels since going paleo (and since starting up with the o-lifting classes).
    I’ve learned what my body likes to run on, which is generally a fairly low carb (except for the occasional binge on medjool dates) diet. I don’t pay attention any further than that, because I am still making great progress every day. I could probably eke out another couple seconds on every workout by weighing, balancing, and measuring everything I take in, but the amount of work that would add to my already busy life is just not worth the return on the investment.
    I will say that I do plan ahead for post workout recovery and things like that already, I just don’t take it to the level where I have to get a certain amount of something and limit it there. I take in more carbs (in the form of sweet potatoes) after a metcon beatdown, and I take in lots of protein in general since I do strength training 3 days a week.
    When I invariably plateau, you bet your ass the first thing I’m going to look at is maybe how I can modify the amount, timing, and ratios of my food intake, but until then, I’m going to eat what looks and tastes good, in the amounts that I want.

  • Rob M
    Reply

    “I’m going to eat what looks and tastes good, in the amounts that I want.”
    Hey! That’s my diet!

  • Andy L
    Reply

    I’ve been measuring, but not weighing. I’ve been meaning to buy a food scale. When it comes to fresh veg I eat with total disregard to serving size or weight.

  • kba_cfatl
    Reply

    Regarding weighing and measuring food, it would be ideal but I know I could not be diligent. I would like to get an idea of what would be good to eat before and after certain types of WODs.. strength, short or long met-cons. At least I could implement that.
    I always try to have protein w/milk + a good carb (coconut water, banana, agave etc), post WOD so I assume I could adjust the amount I have depending on the WOD.
    Regarding sleep, I know the amount a person needs and can get varies, but I was told recently that when you sleep matters. Anyone have feedback on the following:
    “Your circadian rhythms are such that 10pm-2am is physical recovery when your anabolic hormones are released like growth hormone and DHEA. 2am-6am is psychogenic repair. If you go to sleep late, your body can’t make this up and won’t be able to repair itself from the demands of daily life, much less a hard workout.”
    Finally, I will add a quote to the list:
    “You were born with wings. Why prefer to crawl through life?” – Jalaluddin Rumi

  • Nancy E
    Reply

    Bethanie, I’m assuming those are “unisex” sizes?

  • Bethanie
    Reply

    Yes, there are unisex.

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